Posts by The DiscipleShift Training Team

The Invitation Is In The Definition $

The Invitation Is In The Definition

The Invitation Is In The Definition

fishingboats

The Invitation is in the Definition

 

When an influential church community experiences division among its leadership as to the direction and philosophy among their small groups, they frequently turn to Real Life Ministries for guidance. The senior and executive pastors at Real Life Ministries routinely attend seminars to assist churches with concerns like these.

On one such occasion, our Real Life Ministries pastors began by asking the leadership of this particular church a couple of questions. When asked about the purpose of the church, the leaders agreed that the purpose is to make disciples. However, when asked to define what a disciple is, the leadership either could not answer the question, or agree on a definition.

Unfortunately, this type of situation is very common in churches throughout the world. A good analogy would be a home construction crew in agreement about building a house, but not able to agree on what the house should look like when completed.

In order to define what a disciple is, one need look no further than the Bible passage found in Mathew 4:19. Jesus offers an invitation to His future disciples (who were fishermen), to “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men” (ESV). This invitation itself, describes the definition of a disciple.

As these fishermen eventually learn, to follow Jesus will require a life change at the head, heart, and hands level of their beings. In order to become faithful disciples ourselves, we, as Christians, must come to this realization as well.

Come back next week and we will unpack the definition of a disciple!

If you would like to discover more on this topic, you may be interested in these resources:

DiscipleShift 1 Training

The Real Life Discipleship Training Manual

 

 

 

Price: $0.00

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The Invitation Is In The Definition

$

fishingboats

The Invitation is in the Definition

 

When an influential church community experiences division among its leadership as to the direction and philosophy among their small groups, they frequently turn to Real Life Ministries for guidance. The senior and executive pastors at Real Life Ministries routinely attend seminars to assist churches with concerns like these.

On one such occasion, our Real Life Ministries pastors began by asking the leadership of this particular church a couple of questions. When asked about the purpose of the church, the leaders agreed that the purpose is to make disciples. However, when asked to define what a disciple is, the leadership either could not answer the question, or agree on a definition.

Unfortunately, this type of situation is very common in churches throughout the world. A good analogy would be a home construction crew in agreement about building a house, but not able to agree on what the house should look like when completed.

In order to define what a disciple is, one need look no further than the Bible passage found in Mathew 4:19. Jesus offers an invitation to His future disciples (who were fishermen), to “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men” (ESV). This invitation itself, describes the definition of a disciple.

As these fishermen eventually learn, to follow Jesus will require a life change at the head, heart, and hands level of their beings. In order to become faithful disciples ourselves, we, as Christians, must come to this realization as well.

Come back next week and we will unpack the definition of a disciple!

If you would like to discover more on this topic, you may be interested in these resources:

DiscipleShift 1 Training

The Real Life Discipleship Training Manual

 

 

 

What Does A Winning Church Look Like? $

What Does A Winning Church Look Like?

What Does A Winning Church Look Like?

Race

What Does A Winning Church Look Like?

More than twenty years ago, a small group of Christians came together in their homes with one lofty goal in mind. They wanted to bring a disciple-making church to a little slice of northern Idaho. At the time, they could never have imagined how the Lord would work through them to grow Real Life Ministries to a congregation of 8,500 plus.

Through the Word of God, the church founders understood that leadership and discipleship are developed from within the church body itself. They recognized that God has placed potential leaders in every church just waiting to grow into messengers that can accurately spread God’s message.

Jesus came not only to die for our sin, but to train His disciples to train others to deliver the gospel message. In the same way, we as Christians have a sacred mission to go and make disciples.

Sharing the news about Jesus is not all there is to discipleship. Teaching people to obey the commands He gave us is equally important.

Too many believers feel that they have nothing more to offer the church than their weekly service attendance. Even if we are able to get new converts to attend service with us, we feel that we are not equipped or qualified to help them (and ourselves) to mature in God’s Word. We leave that responsibility to the pastor.

This view of Christianity is symptomatic of churches that have not properly discipled their attendees. Real discipleship requires real relationship through personal contact. The lack of this relational context in the learning process makes real life change among Christians less common than it should be.

There are many churches in communities today that focus more on the putting on a good show via music, videos, etc. for the weekly service in an effort to wow the audience. Even if the pastor is able to deliver a good preaching sermon, a system to disciple to the people is often overlooked.

As a result, Christians that are blessed with gifts and abilities that the church needs are taking those gifts to the business or sports world. Those churches are not taking the time to train and use these to their full Christian potential.

This is a simple problem to remedy if churches would return to discipleship models found in the New Testament. In so doing, they will find the path to properly understanding and practicing biblical discipleship.

You can read more about this topic in the book Real Life Discipleship by Jim Putman - purchase your copy here.

Book Ads - Real Life Discipleship

 

Price: $0.00

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What Does A Winning Church Look Like?

$

Race

What Does A Winning Church Look Like?

More than twenty years ago, a small group of Christians came together in their homes with one lofty goal in mind. They wanted to bring a disciple-making church to a little slice of northern Idaho. At the time, they could never have imagined how the Lord would work through them to grow Real Life Ministries to a congregation of 8,500 plus.

Through the Word of God, the church founders understood that leadership and discipleship are developed from within the church body itself. They recognized that God has placed potential leaders in every church just waiting to grow into messengers that can accurately spread God’s message.

Jesus came not only to die for our sin, but to train His disciples to train others to deliver the gospel message. In the same way, we as Christians have a sacred mission to go and make disciples.

Sharing the news about Jesus is not all there is to discipleship. Teaching people to obey the commands He gave us is equally important.

Too many believers feel that they have nothing more to offer the church than their weekly service attendance. Even if we are able to get new converts to attend service with us, we feel that we are not equipped or qualified to help them (and ourselves) to mature in God’s Word. We leave that responsibility to the pastor.

This view of Christianity is symptomatic of churches that have not properly discipled their attendees. Real discipleship requires real relationship through personal contact. The lack of this relational context in the learning process makes real life change among Christians less common than it should be.

There are many churches in communities today that focus more on the putting on a good show via music, videos, etc. for the weekly service in an effort to wow the audience. Even if the pastor is able to deliver a good preaching sermon, a system to disciple to the people is often overlooked.

As a result, Christians that are blessed with gifts and abilities that the church needs are taking those gifts to the business or sports world. Those churches are not taking the time to train and use these to their full Christian potential.

This is a simple problem to remedy if churches would return to discipleship models found in the New Testament. In so doing, they will find the path to properly understanding and practicing biblical discipleship.

You can read more about this topic in the book Real Life Discipleship by Jim Putman - purchase your copy here.

Book Ads - Real Life Discipleship

 

Jim Putman and Richie Shaw Address The Question: Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent? $

Jim Putman and Richie Shaw Address The Question: Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent?

Jim Putman and Richie Shaw Address The Question: Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent?

Transparencysmall

Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent?

This has been an often asked question among lead pastors, and one that was addressed at
the Q&A Session during our January 2017 DiscipleShift 1 Training.  Jim Putman, Senior Pastor at Real Life Ministries - and Richie Shaw, Lead Pastor at Real Life Spokane, both share their perspective on how they view transparency in this 8 minute video clip.

If you would like to learn more about this and other topics in the areas of leadership and disciple making, take a look at our DiscipleShift 1 Training page.

Jan 2017 Q&A Short from Relational Discipleship Network on Vimeo.

 

Price: $0.00

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Jim Putman and Richie Shaw Address The Question: Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent?

$

Transparencysmall

Should A Pastor Ever Be Transparent?

This has been an often asked question among lead pastors, and one that was addressed at
the Q&A Session during our January 2017 DiscipleShift 1 Training.  Jim Putman, Senior Pastor at Real Life Ministries - and Richie Shaw, Lead Pastor at Real Life Spokane, both share their perspective on how they view transparency in this 8 minute video clip.

If you would like to learn more about this and other topics in the areas of leadership and disciple making, take a look at our DiscipleShift 1 Training page.

Jan 2017 Q&A Short from Relational Discipleship Network on Vimeo.

 

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity $

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity

Why does God tell us through His Word that we must be in relationships? Well, because God made us relational beings and He knows we need relationships to thrive. In other words, spiritual relationships as God designs and empowers them are a vital part of the recipe for abundant life

The New Testament metaphor of baptism is a picture of new birth (being born again) into the Christian family, the church. In Christ we are now adopted into the household of God, and even more, we are born into a family with older brothers and sisters.

Paul called himself Timothy's father in the faith and so it is supposed to be with us - we have spiritual parents. Even if we were blessed with believing, mature, disciple making parents, they were never intended to be the only ones who help us mature - the church is God's plan for growing mature disciples who make disciples.

These new believers need the church - God's family that helps others find Christ and then become mature in Him. For the rest of our lives there will be others who teach and invest in us. God's plan is that we will grow to maturity and invest in others as well.

Maturity does not mean that we have no more to learn, or that somehow we are complete and have no need of continual relationships and growth in our lives - that never ends. But there comes a time when we are able to invest in others. Even if we are only one step ahead of a person, we can still lead them as we progress.

You can read more about this topic in Jim Putman's newest book - The Power Of Together Workbook. Click here to order!

Screen Shot 2017-02-21 at 8.01.04 PM

Price: $0.00

Loading Updating cart...

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity

$

Relationships With Others Plays A Vital Role In Spiritual Maturity

Why does God tell us through His Word that we must be in relationships? Well, because God made us relational beings and He knows we need relationships to thrive. In other words, spiritual relationships as God designs and empowers them are a vital part of the recipe for abundant life

The New Testament metaphor of baptism is a picture of new birth (being born again) into the Christian family, the church. In Christ we are now adopted into the household of God, and even more, we are born into a family with older brothers and sisters.

Paul called himself Timothy's father in the faith and so it is supposed to be with us - we have spiritual parents. Even if we were blessed with believing, mature, disciple making parents, they were never intended to be the only ones who help us mature - the church is God's plan for growing mature disciples who make disciples.

These new believers need the church - God's family that helps others find Christ and then become mature in Him. For the rest of our lives there will be others who teach and invest in us. God's plan is that we will grow to maturity and invest in others as well.

Maturity does not mean that we have no more to learn, or that somehow we are complete and have no need of continual relationships and growth in our lives - that never ends. But there comes a time when we are able to invest in others. Even if we are only one step ahead of a person, we can still lead them as we progress.

You can read more about this topic in Jim Putman's newest book - The Power Of Together Workbook. Click here to order!

Screen Shot 2017-02-21 at 8.01.04 PM

How To Build A Church Culture Of Discipleship – Top Leaders Share Their Experience $

How To Build A Church Culture Of Discipleship – Top Leaders Share Their Experience

How To Build A Church Culture Of Discipleship – Top Leaders Share Their Experience

54538845 - business man pointing the text culture

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In the video below, leaders from disciple making churches take the stage at DiscipleShift 1 training in Post Falls, Idaho to answer questions about disciple making and church leadership. These leaders are drawing from their experience as church planters and leaders in churches that have successfully made the shift to a church model of Relational Discipleship - using Jesus' method of discipleship.

Some of the questions they address are:

  • At what point should our leadership consider planting another church?
  • How would it benefit our leaders to be in a small group?
  • What does it look like for a pastor to be transparent with his people? What are the advantages and dangers?
  • Why is having a Biblical world view at an all time low in our culture?
  • How does relational discipleship translate to children's ministry? How are they being engaged?

We hope you enjoy the discussion!

If you would like to know more about DiscipleShift 1 Training, please click here:

 

Price: $0.00

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How To Build A Church Culture Of Discipleship – Top Leaders Share Their Experience

$

54538845 - business man pointing the text culture

Share

In the video below, leaders from disciple making churches take the stage at DiscipleShift 1 training in Post Falls, Idaho to answer questions about disciple making and church leadership. These leaders are drawing from their experience as church planters and leaders in churches that have successfully made the shift to a church model of Relational Discipleship - using Jesus' method of discipleship.

Some of the questions they address are:

  • At what point should our leadership consider planting another church?
  • How would it benefit our leaders to be in a small group?
  • What does it look like for a pastor to be transparent with his people? What are the advantages and dangers?
  • Why is having a Biblical world view at an all time low in our culture?
  • How does relational discipleship translate to children's ministry? How are they being engaged?

We hope you enjoy the discussion!

If you would like to know more about DiscipleShift 1 Training, please click here: